The Nobel prize in literature 2021 – live! - The Guardian

1 month ago 41

Lucy Knight

The Nobel prize official Twitter account posted about 1993 winner Toni Morrison. Morrison is one of just 16 women who have been awarded the prize since it began in 1901.

The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize)

One of the most powerful and distinguished storytellers of our time: Toni Morrison, became the first African American woman to be awarded a #NobelPrize when she received the literature prize in 1993.

Stay tuned to find out the recipient(s) of the 2021 literature prize! pic.twitter.com/G36mWGONYp

October 7, 2021

Lucy Knight

As we pass the time until the ceremony starts, why not try this quiz on the Nobel prize website and see how many laureates you can match to their work?

Alison Flood

Possible contenders: Haruki Murakami

Haruki Murakami
Haruki Murakami Photograph: Philip Fong/AFP/Getty Images

Haruki Murakami is another evergreen favourite. I’m doubtful, but I’d be delighted if this was his year. Perhaps the august Swedish Academy will be persuaded by his forthcoming tome, Murakami T: The T-Shirts I Love, in which the “international literary icon opens his eclectic closet” to share “photographs of [his]extensive and personal T-shirt collection, accompanied by essays that reveal a side of the writer rarely seen by the public”. I’d love to see the citation from the Swedish Academy which could take that in.

Alison Flood

Possible contenders: Ngugi wa Thiong’o

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o Photograph: Murdo MacLeod/The Guardian

After a long run of European or North American winners, will this finally be Kenyan Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s year? The celebrated author is perennially tipped, perennially near the top of the bookies’ odds, and yet always overlooked by the Swedish Academy. Fiammetta Rocco, culture correspondent at the Economist and a fellow Kenyan, is hoping to hear his name come 12pm today. “His most recent book, The Perfect Nine, is his most surprising, proof of how creative he still is at 83,” she told me. “And also, because he is now on daily dialysis, this may be his last chance.”

(Ngugi is also, as always, my hope as well.)

Lucy Knight

Louise Glück
Louise Glück Photograph: Shawn Thew/EPA

Last year poet Louise Glück became the first American woman in 27 years to win the Nobel prize in literature. The 78-year-old writer had previously won the Pulitzer prize and the National Book Award, and was praised by the chair of the Nobel prize committee, Anders Olsson for her “candid and uncompromising” voice, which is “full of humour and biting wit”.

Lucy Knight

The Nobel Prize (@NobelPrize)

Today is the announcement of the 2021 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Ahead of the announcement Ellen Mattson of the Swedish Academy, answers your questions about the literature prize.#NobelPrize pic.twitter.com/KMvOjuIxyh

October 7, 2021

Lucy Knight

Hello and welcome to the Guardian’s live coverage of the Nobel prize in literature, which should be awarded to “the person who shall have produced in the field of literature the most outstanding work in an ideal direction”, according to the will of Alfred Nobel.

This year’s winner will be announced at 12pm BST (1pm CEST). Will it be Annie Ernaux, the bookmaker’s favourite? Will it be another wild card like Bob Dylan, who was chosen in 2016?! Or could it – dare I say it – finally be the year for Japanese bestseller Haruki Murakami, who has surely been practising his acceptance speech for at least a decade.

Join my colleague Alison Flood and me for the next hour or so as we post updates, trivia and speculation about this year’s prize.

Updated at 11.13am BST

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